Roger Federer

Roger Federer Career Statistics

Interesting Facts and Figures From Federer's 21 Year Pro Career

The ATP website is awash with all manner of statistics about Roger Federer's career from simple ones like how many career titles he's won through to more detailed numbers like his deciding set record in best of 3 or best of 5 sets.

Whilst comprehensive they don't cover absolutely everything so I thought I'd use Federer's full ATP match records to see if I could pull off some more interesting facts about his career.

You can see the ones I came up with listed below. Most of the ATP stats are interesting for assessing his career by the numbers in terms of percentages, win/loss records etc. whereas mine are more for Federer aficionados who are interested in some of the lesser known particulars since he turned professional in 1998. 

How Many Different Players Has Roger Federer Played in His Career?

So far in his career, Roger has faced 333 different players.

How Many Players Has Roger Federer Never Beaten and Who are They?

federer squillari

There are just 15 players who Roger has played before and hasn't been able to get a win against. Most of them are players he's only faced once, with Pat Rafter being the only man to play Federer more than twice and still maintain a 100% record (3-0). You can see the full list below:

  • Thanasi Kokkinakis
  • Evgeny Donskoy
  • Franco Squillari
  • Andrea Gaudenzi
  • Patrick Rafter
  • James Sekulov
  • Francisco Clavet
  • Markus Hantschk
  • Andrei Medvedev
  • Sergi Bruguera
  • Christophe Van Garsse
  • Byron Black
  • Kenneth Carlsen
  • Jan Siemerink
  • Lucas Arnold Ker

How Many Players Has Federer Never Lost To and Who Are They?

Federer Ferrer

Of the 318 players Roger has beaten during his career, he's never lost to 225 of them. Many of them are just one time opponents, but there are several who he's faced over ten times with his most impressive records being against Ferrer (17-0), Kohlschreiber (14-0) and Youzhny (17-0).

  • Denis Shapovalov
  • Daniil Medvedev
  • Filip Krajinovic
  • Radu Albot
  • Hubert Hurkacz
  • Kyle Edmund
  • Peter Gojowczyk
  • Marton Fucsovics
  • Fernando Verdasco
  • Philipp Kohlschreiber
  • Taylor Fritz
  • Daniel Evans
  • Denis Istomin
  • Fabio Fognini
  • Marius Copil
  • Jan-Lennard Struff
  • Roberto Bautista Agut
  • Benoit Paire
  • Yoshihito Nishioka
  • Leonardo Mayer
  • Adrian Mannarino
  • Lukas Lacko
  • Dusan Lajovic
  • Denis Kudla
  • Matthew Ebden
  • Aljaz Bedene
  • Guido Pella
  • Mischa Zverev
  • Hyeon Chung
  • Grigor Dimitrov
  • Robin Haase
  • Ruben Bemelmans
  • Jack Sock
  • Frances Tiafoe
  • Alexandr Dolgopolov
  • Diego Schwartzman
  • Feliciano Lopez
  • Mikhail Youzhny
  • David Ferrer
  • Peter Polansky
  • Karen Khachanov
  • Florian Mayer
  • Yuichi Sugita
  • Steve Johnson
  • Stephane Robert
  • Noah Rubin
  • Marcus Willis
  • Malek Jaziri
  • Guillermo Garcia-Lopez
  • Nikoloz Basilashvili
  • Tobias Kamke
  • Mikhail Kukushkin
  • Thiemo de Bakker
  • Jesse Huta Galung
  • Steve Darcis
  • Sam Groth
  • Sam Querrey
  • Damir Dzumhur
  • Marcel Granollers
  • Alejandro Falla
  • Pablo Cuevas
  • Daniel Gimeno-Traver
  • Jarkko Nieminen
  • Simone Bolelli
  • Yen-Hsun Lu
  • James Duckworth
  • Lucas Pouille
  • Gilles Muller
  • Marinko Matosevic
  • Vasek Pospisil
  • Santiago Giraldo
  • Paolo Lorenzi
  • Joao Sousa
  • Dmitry Tursunov
  • Lukas Rosol
  • Andrey Golubev
  • Paul-Henri Mathieu
  • Benjamin Becker
  • Ilija Bozoljac
  • Teymuraz Gabashvili
  • Blaz Kavcic
  • Carlos Berlocq
  • Grega Zemlja
  • Jan Hajek
  • Victor Hanescu
  • Cedrik-Marcel Stebe
  • Somdev Devvarman
  • Pablo Carreno Busta
  • Jerzy Janowicz
  • Potito Starace
  • Ivan Dodig
  • Bernard Tomic
  • Janko Tipsarevic
  • Thomaz Bellucci
  • Donald Young
  • Alex Bogomolov Jr.
  • Nicolas Mahut
  • Adrian Ungur
  • Ryan Harrison
  • Michael Llodra
  • Andreas Beck
  • Alexander Kudryavtsev
  • Juan Monaco
  • Dudi Sela
  • Rui Machado
  • Maxime Teixeira
  • Olivier Rochus
  • Juan Ignacio Chela
  • Igor Andreev
  • Viktor Troicki
  • Marco Chiudinelli
  • Thomas Schoorel
  • Taylor Dent
  • Brian Dabul
  • Philipp Petzschner
  • Julian Reister
  • Peter Luczak
  • Florent Serra
  • Nicolas Lapentti
  • Evgeny Korolev
  • Christophe Rochus
  • Simon Greul
  • Devin Britton
  • Jose Acasuso
  • Frederic Niemeyer
  • Alberto Martin
  • Kevin Kim
  • Marc Gicquel
  • Bobby Reynolds
  • Kristof Vliegen
  • Thiago Alves
  • Maximo Gonzalez
  • Rafael Arevalo
  • Robby Ginepri
  • Jan Vacek
  • Michael Berrer
  • Ruben Ramirez Hidalgo
  • Denis Gremelmayr
  • Fred Gil
  • Diego Hartfield
  • Paul Capdeville
  • Scoville Jenkins
  • Nicolas Almagro
  • Thierry Ascione
  • Michael Russell
  • Carlos Moya
  • Hyung-Taik Lee
  • Daniele Bracciali
  • Kristian Pless
  • Jonas Bjorkman
  • Paradorn Srichaphan
  • Tomas Zib
  • Takao Suzuki
  • Wesley Moodie
  • Jimmy Wang
  • Rohan Bopanna
  • Benjamin Balleret
  • Robin Vik
  • Mohammad Ghareeb
  • Ivo Minar
  • Gaston Gaudio
  • Guillermo Coria
  • Marcos Daniel
  • Alan Mackin
  • Bohdan Ulihrach
  • Ivo Heuberger
  • Nicolas Thomann
  • Thomas Johansson
  • Tomas Behrend
  • Alex Bogdanovic
  • Todd Reid
  • Jeff Morrison
  • Martin Verkerk
  • Karol Beck
  • Jean-Rene Lisnard
  • Scott Draper
  • David Sanchez
  • Marc Lopez
  • Fernando Vicente
  • Sargis Sargsian
  • Raemon Sluiter
  • Zeljko Krajan
  • Maximilian Abel
  • Irakli Labadze
  • Lars Burgsmuller
  • Flavio Saretta
  • Michel Kratochvil
  • Andrei Stoliarov
  • Alexander Waske
  • Marcelo Rios
  • Denis Golovanov
  • Jiri Vanek
  • Richard Krajicek
  • David Prinosil
  • Hendrik Dreekmann
  • Adrian Voinea
  • Albert Portas
  • John van Lottum
  • Attila Savolt
  • Julien Boutter
  • Pete Sampras
  • Antony Dupuis
  • Wayne Arthurs
  • Stefano Galvani
  • Andrew Ilie
  • Bob Bryan
  • Cyril Saulnier
  • Todd Martin
  • Goran Ivanisevic
  • Magnus Norman
  • Karim Alami
  • Mikael Tillstrom
  • Daniel Nestor
  • Vladimir Voltchkov
  • Justin Gimelstob
  • Fredrik Jonsson
  • Filip Dewulf
  • Jan Kroslak
  • Jens Knippschild
  • Daniel Vacek
  • Alexander Popp
  • Martin Damm
  • Cedric Pioline
  • Guillaume Raoux
  • Jerome Golmard

Other Stats From the Data

federer facts
  • Average Ranking of All Opponents Faced: 60
  • Average Ranking of Opponent in Finals: 18
  • Walkovers Given: 4
  • Walkovers Received: 13
  • Retirements: 0
  • Longest Losing Streak: 9 matches
  • Longest Winning Streak: 41 matches

Download the Full Data Set

I've made the full data set open to anyone who wants it:

Roger Federer Career Matches Google Doc.

Go to File > Make a Copy if you want to manipulate or play around with the data. If you come up with any stats or find anything interesting in there, let me know and I will add it here.

Ideas for Other Stats and Facts

Do you have any ideas for what other bits of info can be gleaned from the data? Let me know your suggestions in the comments and I'll try to get you the answer.

All data correct as of 29th April 2019. I will be updating the stats when required after each tournament Federer plays in.

Jonathan

Huge fan of Roger Federer. I watch all his matches from Grand Slam level right down to ATP 250. When I'm not watching or tweeting about tennis I play regularly myself and use this blog to share my thoughts on Federer and tennis in general.

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68 Comments

    1. Finally a win, after 4 months into 2019 😱😱😱

      Thanks for the stats Jon… definitely Roger has amazing records and I’m sure he’ll get a few more before he retires #GOAT

  1. Yea, interesting, really! And never retired! –
    I guess most of the persons with perfect beating Roger have retired the race now. Interesting for me that Kenneth Carlsen is too in this row of honor? Well he has retired long ago I think, but sometimes (Wimbledon) I am forced to listen to his commenting broadcasted along the matches. Ah well not too bad. Sympathetic, and still looks like he’s playing the game…:)

    1. Only 2 are still playing, Kokk and Donskoy. So he could get the list down to 13 if he beats them both.

      Carlsen was pretty good, leftie but I only ever saw him at Wimbledon. Fed lost to him Miami 1999.

  2. Thanks for the analysis Jonathan. I love the 225 list of opponents he has never lost to, that’s a huge confidence builder. I didn’t realize that RBA, Dimitrov, R Haase, Verdasco, and Fognini were on the list.

    1. Yeah, a lot of good players on the list really. 17-0 vs Ferrer. I guess he must be the only guy to have a perfect record against him having played over 5 times.

  3. Very impressive Jonathan! 15 players with no wins against 318 always beaten. Roger is unique. Miss his game and can’t wait to watch him back in business. Thanks for the stats!

      1. It’s both memory and intelligence. You never hear another player coming out with such original, relevant and meaningful answers to the questions being posed, be it the on-court interviews, press conferences or other. It’s even more impressive due to the overwhelming number of requests he must attend to.
        [Little boy: “Hey, Roger, can I take a selfie with you?”
        Roger: “Sure, just turn off the flash. Beyond a couple of meters it’s useless and very close it’s overexposure and you will blind me and I won’t be able to read Isner’s serve accurately tomorrow.”
        Little boy: “Mommy! Help!”
        Roger: “Sorry. Here’s a candy.”
        Little boy: “Is it Lindt?”
        Roger: “Yes, I just stole it from their stand over there”.
        Little boy: “But don’t they sponsor you?”
        Roger: “The contract forbids sneaking around the stands on public fairs”
        Little boy: “You must get a better lawyer”.
        Roger: “That might help. Can I borrow your parrot?”
        Little boy: “Yes, but it’s dead.”]
        Anyone (mostly) else can only babble the usual clichΓ©s, which is when I usually turn off the sound.
        Raonic seems to have a very good memory too.

  4. Yes, ‘Retirements: 0’ – Roger’s toughness is underrated.
    I still remember ATP final 2008(?) in shanghai vs Andy Murray. In spite of suffering from a bad back, he refused to quit…
    The most impressive one on the Never lost list for me is vs David Ferrer. Incredible against another resilient guy on tour.
    Great post, well done, Jonathan.

  5. I don’t think those matches are really close to 2008 bad back match though. Only one I can think of is in either Hamburg or Gstaad where he could barely walk and still finished the match. That match vs Murray was crazy.

  6. I wonder if Murray will return to delight us all on court.
    He has lovely white teeth now apparently.😊😷

    1. I saw that. Fair enough his choice but dunno why he has bothered tbh?

      To me he’s the sort of guy that will have been slating cosmetic stuff sat watching TV then goes and gets a set of veneers because Simon Fuller says it’s a good idea πŸ˜€

      Never met him obviously but based on my theory that should absolutely judge a book by it’s cover, then I see Murray as a bit of a worm like character. Same agent as Beckham and pulls lot of moves from that playbook. Gets lots of plaudits for his stances (that are always safe, after the media has outlined what you should be saying and have zero controversy whatsoever) but get the feeling he doesn’t buy into half of what he’s saying. Just another PR pony.

      Who remembers that story of him saving a dog on his way to Wimbledon? πŸ˜€ Clearly a complete PR play.

      1. Fucking finally, someone said it. I agree with you in everything.
        Unbelievable how many people falls into media’s hands nowadays.

      2. Murray is dry, made some funny quips over the years.

        But yeah, the media (and the west in general) is rapidly going downhill now. If you have any sort of opinion that isn’t in line with the new world order agenda then you are silenced or vilified. They are absolutely controlling the narrative. And unless you have the nouse to sift through the bullshit, seek out more sources and question more then you are completely controlled. Been cynical and questioning everyone’s motives has never been more useful.

        It’s all a bit like the end of the Roman empire.

  7. Today 6.30 pm is main draw ceremony at Mutua Madrid. Not of interest here? Murray teeth more important? πŸ˜‰

  8. The womens draw is today at 12. The men’s is tomorrow at 11am so yes it’s of interest. More so than you it seems as I actually know when it is πŸ˜„

  9. As you may all know, Feliciano Lopez is the director of Madrid Open now. He seems happy to a bursting degree that Roger will play his clay πŸ™‚

      1. No I don’t. And I’m not reading much into it. Simply first impression. Did you have similar?

    1. Thats great news.But what on earth has happened to Sascha?
      He seems hopeless since Lendl began to coach him.Still I suppose he is very young.
      And can improve.
      Just heard that Delpo is going to play in Madrid.😱

      1. Annie. Sascha had a lot of luck, winning some Masters having hurt opponents in the finals (like hurt Federer in Canada. Pundits have seen no.1 ib him very soon. But he always missed 5-setter prowess.

        He was peaking last 2 years on this wave. Now it’s over. He is 19. in London race this year. His best achievement this season is a loss to Kyrgios in Acapulco final.

        Just start to forget him as a top force in tennis.

        Young and can improve? Rather totally frustrated. He loses now to age-mates, who come from nowhere like Garin. Top20 is his real potential.

        Don’t know if Lendl is still with him. This is not a material for Lendl.

      2. Zverev split with his girlfriend, is in a legal battle with former agent and his father is in hospital. Quite a few off court distractions.

      3. Sascha may have had luck, but for sure not presently. He will be back in top ten soon.

    1. That’s one thing. Another thing – According to my expectation Zverev is not going for No. 1. Rather to fall out from Top10. His game is primitive and boring (always was). I hope, after Madrid Thiem is 4. This would be good both for him and for Fed. Not a good idea to meet Thiem before SF. I would like another Thiem-Fed final. It’s realistic. Thiem defeats Nadal/Djoker in one SF, Fed defeats Djoker/Nadal in another πŸ™‚

  10. @Jonathan
    You split with your girlfriend and next half a year you cannot do your job correctly (whatever the jobs). You are fired after 3 days. That’s it.

    Splitting with girlfriends and then falling in the ranking for a year or two is Dimitrov’s specialty. Not a perfect role model for Sascha.
    Father in hospital? I have seen his father on tribunes (but no Lendl). Legal something is nothing extra.

    Zverev was overrated with big hype pumping his ego. Why do’t he use the bad fate to focus totally on tennis and reach number 1?

    His potential was always overrated and he misses the base for the restart. Sascha did not any progress in the game over last 2 years.

    And … still too much gold on the neck. Symbolizing his big ego, not his potential.

    1. Why don’t you cut Zerev some slack, nobody knows why he hasn’t
      been in his best form….he’s young and I’m sure will bounce back.
      Good wins for DT been a long time coming the masters 1000 I
      mean, and he totally outplayed Rafa so congrats to him for that.
      I laughed at your remarks ‘too much gold on the neck…big ego’
      and to top it off he’s young looks like Alex is a doing ok

      1. He did have an illness at the start of the year that saw him drop a fair few KG’s too. It’s only May, see how he’s done when London rolls around.

  11. @Jonathan
    Thiem was ill since off-season preparation until Australian Open, where he defeated Paire after 4 hours match having pulse 200 all over the match. Then needed to retire against Popyrin.

    First matches (still not 100% healthy) where in Buenos Aires, then the virus hit again back in Rio, giving him extra days for recovery before IW. You know, what happened in IW.

    Zverev is no more ill since long time (if we skip GOLD FEVER πŸ˜‰

      1. I ‘m not competitive vs. Jonathan and hmmm … maybe my information is not valid and Jonathan comes later with the right one (from an anonymous individual close to Feli Lopez ;)).

        Take this into account.
        I don’t need (here,, other than on my blog) to write an article, analyze the draw for RF.

        I need to do the same on my blog for Thiem … well, I was prepared and the main article was ready some days ago, so I was only waiting for names πŸ™‚

        See you in QF πŸ™‚ (I wanted them to meet first in final, but hey … I’m not responsible for the draw …

      2. And … Jonathan can delete my comment, I cannot delete his post πŸ˜‰ (I know, i know – bastion of … )
        And – my comment will be no more visible after Jon is ready with article for the new thread πŸ™‚

  12. My guess of Roger’s path:
    BYE>Gasquet>Goffin/Fucsovic/Monfils>Thiem/Fognini (probably end station)>Djokovic>Nadal/Nishikori

  13. Idea for Federer stat (compared to other): Success in hawk eye challenges.

    I saw some very old stats that put him at about 3rd best in successful challenges (for players that had a significant number of challenges at that time). However, TV commentators like to repeat the myth that Roger is the worst at challenging.

      1. Hi Jonathan,

        The results were publicly available in summarised form, if I remember correctly. I would have to search for it again.

        Thank you for the link you provided. This information is much newer and more extensive.

        Now, how to get the commentators to stop with their ‘fake news’?

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